2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, Company "A"

Uniform & Equipment Guidelines

compiled and approved by the R. V. R. Board of Directors

approved and implemented by the 2nd Minn. , Co. "A" Commissioned Officers

           

R. V. R. Bylaws Article VIII-Impressions, Section 3 (Authenticity): “Each member is expected to improve the authenticity of their impression through research, education and open mindedness. Selection of clothing and equipment shall be made according to the guidelines of this Corporation and with the advice of knowledgeable members to ensure authenticity.”

 

            All veterans and recruits of the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry are expected to follow our unit guidelines when making first time purchases, when upgrading, and when replacing any equipment for any reason. The gear you borrow or currently own will usually be acceptable until you are able to upgrade, but from this point forward you will be expected to follow our unit guidelines when purchasing any new or used gear.

            Our authenticity standards are more demanding and exacting than those of many other reenacting units. Consequently, the prices for uniforms and equipment that meet our standards are often higher than you can find at a "general line" sutler. We require that you stick to our list of uniforms and equipment and buy only from our approved vendors. Items from other sources will usually not meet our high standards and may not be acceptable when falling in with us. Talk to the R. V. R. Board or Military Officers before purchasing anything from vendors other than those we have approved for a particular item. If you know of a source that meets our standards but is not listed, please inform us so we can add them to the list.

            In the "enlisted men's" section of these guidelines you will find descriptions of uniforms, clothing, accouterments and other equipment needed for light marching order, full marching order, and items to round out your impression. We highly recommend that you completely outfit yourself in light marching order first. When you have all of your light marching order gear, buy the remaining items needed for full marching order. Only when you are completely outfitted in full marching order should you consider items listed under "rounding out your impression." We have also added a section for commissioned officers in this edition of the guidelines.

            Along with the descriptions of each item are the approved vendors for each item. Where possible we have noted what each approved vendor calls his version of an item. If a particular version of an item is not listed here it probably doesn't meet our standards -- don't buy it. Some vendors are recommended for some items but are not good sources for other items they may sell. In each list of vendors you will notice one is highlighted in italics. This notes a "preferred vendor" -- one whose combination of quality, accuracy, price, and service are especially notable.

            In addition to the listed vendors, our Supply Clerk often has items in stock for purchase by unit members, usually fatigue blouses and trowsers. The Supply Clerk can also assist you with your order, and may be able to arrange a bulk purchase deal if other members are in need of the same item you are looking for.

            The last section of the guidelines provides contact information for each approved vendor. We encourage you to surf their websites and contact any and all of them. Don't hesitate to ask them questions about what you're buying. Also ask them for a realistic estimate of delivery time, and understand that you may have to wait, especially when a vendor is a one man shop. Plan ahead and allow several weeks to several months for delivery. While you wait, don't hesitate to borrow what you need to participate with us. Talk to the Supply Clerk about what you need to borrow and we'll do what we can to get you outfitted until your "good stuff" arrives.

            Lastly, do not plan on buying anything at reenactment events. Most of our approved vendors do not set up at events; they only do business by phone/mail/internet.

            “Gentlemen, for the honor of the 2nd Minnesota ! Forward -- March!”


 

Enlisted Men and Non-Commissioned Officers

 

Light Marching Order

 

Uniform/Clothing Fatigue blouses and trowsers were issued in sizes 1-4 (sizes 5, 6 & 7 were issued as needed). Issue shirts were "one size fits all." Poorly fitting uniforms are very accurate, as are modifications made by individual soldiers with varying degrees of skill. Wear your uniform "as issued" or make it fit the best you can, but do not order a "custom fit" uniform.

 

Fatigue Blouse: The J. T. Martin contract pattern was the most widely issued blouse in either theater of the war. Medium to dark blue, indigo dyed, 8-10 ounce/yard 100% wool flannel with a visible diagonal or twill weave, machine sewn with hand worked button holes, medium size US Infantry buttons, the body lined with light weight wool flannel or wool/cotton jean cloth, the sleeves lined with muslin, and with shallow scallops at the back of the sleeve cuffs.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - Lined Contract Style Fatigue Blouse

Camp Randall Quartermaster - J. T. Martin Contract Fatigue Blouse

Historic Clothiers - J. T. Martin Contract Fatigue Blouse

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Osgood Historical Clothiers - Contract Lined Blouse

W., W. & Co. - Federal Contract Blouse, lined

           

Trowsers: T he J. T. Martin contract pattern was the most widely issued. Sky-blue, 18-20 ounce/yard 100% wool kersey with a visible twill weave, machine sewn with hand worked button holes, four paper-backed tin suspender buttons, watch pocket with welt of trowser material across the top. Trowser legs should have a one inch cuff vent on the outside seams. Trowsers must be made with a high waist (around your navel) and have a back yoke, making the back of the waistband about two inches higher than the front. Ideally, trowsers will stay up without suspenders. If you wear suspenders with two button tabs on the front ends, you will need two additional suspender buttons of pewter, tin, brass, wood, or gutta-percha.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - Federal Issue Trowsers, Foot Pattern

Historic Clothiers - J. T. Martin Trousers

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Osgood Historical Clothiers - J. T. Martin Contract Trousers, Cinn. Depot

 

Bootees: Jefferson bootees, black leather, rough side out (sheered and waxed), pegged or sewn leather soles and leather heels, slightly squared toes with a graceful chisel-shape profile, four pairs of lace holes with a fifth pair through the vamp (base of the tongue). Heel plates are acceptable but of questionable accuracy; hobnails are also acceptable.

 

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

M. J. N. Boot & Leather Shop - Jefferson Bootee

Mattimore Harness - Progressive Shoe or Brogan

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Jefferson Bootee #JB-2 ; bulk hobnails

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Brogans, "Ultimate Campaigner" #U-036 (Mattimore's "Progressive")

 

Shirt: The regulation issue domet flannel (wool/cotton blend) shirt was the most often worn shirt in either theater throughout the war. It c an be machine sewn, but must have hand worked button holes, with hand felled seams and top stitching. Domet flannel i ssue shirts should be white or off-white, with one paper-backed tin button at the neck and one on each cuff. The "contractor variant" issue shirt of wool flannel is also very accurate for either theater or period. Grey is preferred but tan is acceptable. Contractor shirts should be completely machine sewn but must have hand worked button holes. A contractor shirt should have three or four paper-backed tin buttons on the front placket and collar, and one on each cuff, and may have one or two chest pockets.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - Federal Issue Contract Shirt (size 1: 36 -44" chest, size 2: 46 -48" chest) ; Pattern 1851 Federal Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest)

Historic Clothiers - Federal Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest)

Home Front - Federal Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest, larger sizes available by special order)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Myrtle Avenue Clothiers - Federal Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest)

Osgood Historical Clothiers - Federal Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest, larger sizes available by special order)

W., W. & Co. - Contract Variant Issue Shirt (one size: 36-44" chest, larger sizes available by special order)

 

Drawers: Made of canton (cotton) flannel which has a soft, absorbent nap inside and a durable twill finish outside. Drawers may be machine sewn but must have hand-worked button holes, with bone, porcelain, shell, wood, or paper-backed tin buttons. Drawers should be ankle length, with ties around the ankles.

 

Abraham & Company - Federal Issue Drawers

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - Imported Ready-Made Drawers

Nancy Eddins - drawers, canton flannel

Historic Clothiers - Federal Issue Canton Flannel Drawers

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Myrtle Avenue Clothiers - Federal Issue Drawers

 

Suspenders: (If your trowsers will stay up without them, go without. Suspenders are over-represented in the hobby.) Solid color or striped, cotton, linen, or canvas web fabric with one or two straight edged leather button tabs on each front end and a single leather button tab on the back ends. Suspenders should cross in back, but should not be stitched together when you buy them. You may hand-stitch them together if you desire. Suspender buckles should be of brass, tin, or japanned (black-lacquered) steel. "Poor Boy" suspenders, simple cotton or canvas straps with hand worked button holes on each end, are also acceptable.

 

The Arsenal - Poor Boys; adjustable Poor Boys

Chris Graham

Historic Clothiers

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Brian "Speedy" Merrick - various styles and colors, no two pairs the same (all are accurate)

 

Socks: Period machine knit issue socks of undyed cotton or wool.

 

Mickey Black - period machine knit cotton issue socks

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - period machine knit heavy-weight wool issue socks ; (retail source for Mickey Black socks)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for Mickey Black socks)

Tart, Brantley & Benjamin - "Confederate Army Socks"

 

Hats Some events require a forage cap for dress parade and guard duty, per regulations. For that reason only, if you have only one quality hat it should be a forage cap . It will be accurate for either theater and any period. A "Hardee" hat is also accurate for either theater and any period, and is more useful as protection from sun and rain. "Hardee" hats are strongly encouraged, but should be purchased only after you have a quality forage cap.

 

Forage Cap: Light weight, dark blue wool fabric, with brown or black polished cotton lining, small paper label affixed to inside of crown, hand sewn leather or painted cloth sweat band, and a welt (piping) of dark blue wool fabric around the crown and above the brim. Visor and chin strap of light weight painted leather, small brass "eagle" buttons. "Type I" caps with a crescent shaped, slightly slanting visor and smaller diameter crown are preferred (note: this is not a "McDowell style cap). "Type II" caps with a flat rectangular visor and larger diameter crown are also appropriate. Phillips, M & G, and Hoff were the three largest contractors of forage caps; copies of their caps are preferred. Company letters and other hat brass or ornamentation should not be used unless dictated by a particular event scenario.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - (retail source for Joel Bohy caps) Private Wiedershiem Cap (Type I), Private Willis Cap (Type II), George Hoff Contract Cap

Dirty Billy’s Hats - 1862 M&G Contract #US10 (Type I); 1858 Phillips Contract #US20 (Type II)

Historic Clothiers - various reproductions of Type I and Type II caps

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Forage Hat, U.S. M1858 #U-003B (Semancik's "1858 Pattern Forage Cap")

Chris Semancik - 1858 Pattern Forage Cap (Type I)

Greg Starbuck - various reproductions of Type I and Type II caps

 

"Hardee" Hat: Enlisted man's US Army hat of black fur felt with no lining, label affixed to inside of crown, hand sewn leather sweatband, narrow satin or grosgrain ribbon around the crown with a bow on the left side, and two lines of stitching around the brim (no ribbon on the brim). Crown should be 5 3/4 - 6" high, with 3 - 3 1/4" wide brim. Hardee hats may be worn as issued, or the crown and brim may be modified to suit your personal taste. Brass insignia, hat cords, feathers, and other ornamentation should not be used unless dictated by a particular event scenario.

 

Dirty Billy's Hats - Enlisted Man's Hardee Hat #US8

T. P. & H. Trading Company - Hardee 1858 Dress Hat, enlisted

 

Accouterments   Leathers must be bridle leather with the smooth side dyed black. All accouterments must be as issued by the U.S. Army. Request your leather gear be made with no maker's marks or inspector's marks as such markings often limit the gear to a particular time and place.

 

Waist Belt & Plate: 1.9” bridle leather belt, smooth side dyed black, with leather keeper loop. Stamped brass oval plate with block letter " US ," lead filled back and brass "puppy paw" studs to attach the plate to the belt.

 

Historic Clothiers - Waist belt with leather keeper

C. & D. Jarnagin - Black Bridle Leather Belt with leather loop #271A; Puppy Foot Plate #SPB138

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Waist belt, smooth grain leather with standing loop; Waist belt plate with puppy paw back

 

Cartridge Box & Sling: M1861 pattern .58 caliber cartridge box of black bridle leather, with divided tins and stamped brass oval box plate with block letter " US " and lead filled back. For safety, all cartridge boxes must have tins. Plate should be placed at the visual center of the box. Sling should be bridle leather, smooth side dyed black, with a round "eagle" breast plate. Men of exceptional height may wish to purchase a longer sling (C&D Jarnagin or Missouri Boot & Shoe).

 

Historic Clothiers - Model 1861 cartridge box, .58 cal., hand or partially machine stitched, unmarked; Standard Cartridge Box Belt

C. & D. Jarnagin - Western Manufactured Unmarked 1861 Pattern Box - .58 cal #WMFG204E; Early US Box Plate #BXP299; Bridle Leather Sling #HR260 (extra long available by request); Round Eagle Sling Plate #300

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Pattern 1861 Box, .58 cal., unmarked; Cartridge Box Plate; Eagle Shoulder Belt Plate; Cartridge Box Shoulder Belt (size A: 64 1/2", size B: 72")

 

Cap Box: M1850 cap box with inner flap, sheepskin sewn into box, and a loop for a cone pick. Stamped "US" on outer flap is acceptable.

 

Historic Clothiers - Model 1850 Cap Box, unmarked

C. & D. Jarnagin - 1850 cap box - mid war #HS242

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - US Pattern 1850, standard style

 

Bayonet Scabbard: Gaylord ( Springfield ) style two rivet scabbard with bridle leather frog. For safety, all scabbards must have a brass tip, which should be attached with small brads.

 

Historic Clothiers - 2 rivet pattern, unmarked

C. & D. Jarnagin - 1859 US Waist Belt Scabbard - two rivet #245, with bridle leather frog

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Early War 2 Rivet with bridle leather belt loop

 

Haversack: Black painted or "tarred" 6 ounce cotton or drill cloth, 12"-14" tall and 10"-12" wide at the bottom, with 5/8" japanned (black lacquered) roller buckle, cotton or linen inner bag attached with three paper-backed tin buttons. Strap should be no more than 2" wide and 40-45" long.

 

Haversack Depot - West Point Museum model ; Quartermaster Museum model

Historic Clothiers - Federal Issue Haversack

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Haversack, Tarred "Ultimate Campaigner" #E-022A

 

Canteen: Smoothside canteen of hot-dipped tin, with a steel cork ring, three tin or steel strap keepers, and tin or pewter spout. Cover should be gray/brown jean cloth. Straps may be cotton, canvas or linen tape and should be no more than 72" long (and shortened to fit you properly). The cork should be tied to a strap keeper with hemp or jute twine, and there should not be a hole in the strap keeper.

            Leather canteen slings are strongly suggested (sometimes required) for early war events through summer 1862. Leather canteen slings should be russet or undyed leather with a trapezoidal guard behind the buckle, a 5/8" roller buckle and leather keeper loop.

 

Historic Clothiers - Leather Canteen Sling ; canteen covers and straps

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Russet Leather Canteen Sling

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Canteen, "Ultimate Campaigner", smoothside #E-073 (specify gray/brown cover, smoothside, hot dipped, jute twine, no hole in strap keeper, Cincinnati contractor stamp or no stamp) ; Canteen Cover Kit, Federal Ultimate Campaigner #E-061 (grey-brown)

 

Weapons The 1861 .58 caliber Springfield rifle-musket was the most common weapon issued throughout the war. Other weapons are not acceptable. For safety and authenticity, enlisted men will not carry side arms or belt knives unless dictated by specific event scenarios, and then only in appropriate holsters and sheaths.

 

Rifle-Musket: Must be "authenticized" (modern markings removed and appropriate period marks added) and stocks refinished with boiled linseed oil if needed. All rifle-muskets must have a functional half-cock that will support the weight of the piece when suspended by the trigger.

 

Lodgewood Mfg. - "authenticized" 1861 Springfield (also "authenticizes" rifle-muskets bought elsewhere); 1861 Musket Tool (cone wrench), various and sundry gunsmithing and parts (works at events, including "authenticizing")

John Zimmerman - "authenticized" 1861 Springfield (also "authenticizes" rifle-muskets bought elsewhere)

 

Bayonet: Bayonets should be of high quality carbon steel and must have proper " US " mark on the blade and any modern markings removed, and must have an accurate locking ring. it is recommended that you buy your bayonet at the same time as your rifle-musket in order to assure a proper fit.

 

Lodgewood Mfg. - Armi Sport (Italian) Springfield bayonets ; reproduction lock rings for India-made bayonets

 

Messware All messware should be carried in your haversack or in/on your knapsack or blanket roll. Mess ware was sometimes issued, but soldiers were often left to find what they could. Civilian messware is very accurate for soldiers.

 

Dipper/Cup: Large (4x4 inch) or smaller tin cup with a flat bottom soldered on and an ear shaped  or “C” shaped handle riveted and/or wired on.

 

G. & P. Mercantile - U. S. Issue Cup; Civilian Cup ; Small Civilian Cup

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Military Furnishings - Issue Tin Cup, large or small

Otter Creek Tinware - Type II Dipper; Tapered Dipper; Civilian/USSC Cup

Village Tinsmithing Works - Military Cup; Civilian Cup

 

Utensils: Knives and forks should have bone or wood handles with minimal or no decoration. Forks will generally have three tines, knife blades will have rounded tips like a modern butter knife, but should have a keen edge. Spoons will be silver, pewter, or tin, or carved from wood, mostly tablespoon size. Some issue spoons were made in two pieces, riveted, and tinned. Knives are optional, a pocket knife will suffice.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - folding pocket knife

C. & D. Jarnagin - Fork & Knife Set # 443; Army Spoon #444; Fork, Knife and Spoon Set #444TS

Dixie Gun Works - Jack Knife #KE5909

G. Gedney Godwin - Half Penny Knife #461

Jersey Skillet Licker Products - (retail source for several vendors)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Eating Utensil Set, knife, fork and spoon #OT-116

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Antique Fiddleback Spoons

Village Tinsmithing Works - Knife, Fork & Spoon Set

 

Plate/Frying Pan/ Canteen Half: You will need at least one of the three. Plates can be flat pressed tin or have short sides, and should be 8-9" in diameter. Plates with soldered sides should not be used to fry food. Frying pans should be sheet steel, about 6" in diameter, with a separate steel or cast iron handle riveted on. One half of a tin canteen can be used as a plate and/or a frying pan.

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - Canteen Half #CH404, Tin Plate #424

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Military Furnishings - 2nd Minnesota soldier's plate (the only reproduction item known to be copied from a 2nd Minn original!)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Tin Canteen Half #E-072 ; Tin Plate, Hot Dipped #A-040A

Village Tinsmithing Works - Tin Plate; Pressed Dinner Plate; Sheet Steel Skillet

 

Boiler (optional): Modify a period tin can or large dipper/cup by adding a wire bail.

 

G. & P. Mercantile - Field Modified Tin Can

Otter Creek Tinware - Small Boiler

Village Tinsmithing Works - Peach Can Boiler

 

Food Hardtack, salt pork, and coffee were the staples of a campaigner's diet. Salt, pepper, and sugar (look for unrefined or raw sugar in the health food section of your local grocery store) are accurate seasonings, but were not always available. "Foraged" foods are accurate within the limits of a specific event scenario and depending on seasonal, regional and period availability. "Foraged" foods are extremely over-represented in the hobby. Poke-sacks and small tins, bottles, or gourds are accurate containers for coffee, sugar and other dry items. Meat can be wrapped in cloth or paper and tied with string (waxed brown paper is most accurate, parchment paper, plain brown paper or white butcher paper are acceptable).

 

Hardtack: Purchased hardtack is preferred as it has the "as issued" look. Hardtack may be made at home from a period recipe if it is made to look (and taste) as if it were issued. Use of a commercially available hardtack cutter is recommended.

 

G. H. Bent Company - hardtack

Village Tinsmithing Works - hardtack cutter

 

Salt Pork: Historically accurate salt pork is very hard to find, especially in the upper Midwest . Double or triple smoked slab bacon is an acceptable substitute, as bacon was issued in lieu of salt pork.

local butcher shops

 

Coffee: Coffee was issued as green (unroasted) beans, roasted beans, and roasted and ground. All are acceptable. Many soldiers kept their sugar and coffee rations in the same poke sack.

 

local grocery stores

 

Miscellaneous

 

Tobacco: Pipes should be clay or clay bowls with reed stems, or  briar pipes (some ornately carved). Pipe tobacco may be in rope, flake or loose form. Chewing tobacco should be in twists or plugs, not snuff. Cigars were expensive and much harder to find than pipe or chewing tobacco, and were very rare among enlisted men. Nasal snuff was an affectation of Southern women. Cigarettes are not acceptable under any circumstances.

 

The Haversack - clay pipes; briar pipes; assorted pipe and chewing tobacco

R. Ubben Pipes - custom handmade pipes

 

Spectacles: Most soldiers with less than perfect vision did not wear spectacles. If you can, go without or wear contacts. If you must wear spectacles they must be of period design. Civil War era spectacles had oval frames with clear lenses no more than one inch across, and straight or rigid curved temples. Spectacles of this style are acceptable for all soldiers. Spectacles of the 1840s and 1850s had small rectangular or sometimes hexagonal frames with clear lenses and an open "teardrop" ferule on the end of the temple piece. Some pre-war specs had adjustable sliding temples. 1840s or 1850s style spectacles are very appropriate for middle-aged soldiers. Flexible, curved cable ear pieces are a post-war invention and nose pads came much later, neither is acceptable. Modern eye glasses and sunglasses are not acceptable under any circumstances.

 

Re-enactment Eyewear - mid-19th century and Civil War era frames fitted with prescription lenses

Spectacle Accoutrements - restored mid-19th century and Civil War era frames fitted with prescription lenses

Ed Welch's Antique Vintage Eyeglasses - original mid-19th century and Civil War spectacle frames

 

Personal Hygiene and Medications: Soap, when it was issued or obtained, was used to wash clothes first, not bodies, but you may bathe if you wish. Lye soap, bone or wood handled tooth brushes, tooth powder (or plain baking soda), and wood, horn or rubber combs are available. Medications can be kept in period containers and used away from other reenactors.

 

The Arsenal - tooth brush; hard rubber comb; hand mirror; lye soap

Orchard Hill Sutlery - bone handled toothbrushes, tooth powder, horn combs, lye & lard soap, beeswax candles, matches

 

Hair styles: Side parted hair, shorter on the sides and longer on top, is most accurate (men never parted their hair in the center -- women always did). Facial hair of virtually any conventional style is accurate, as is being clean shaven (over 50% of enlisted men were clean shaven). Unconventional styles, unnatural colors and center parted hair are not acceptable.

 

 

Full Marching Order

 

In addition to the items needed for light marching order, you will need:

 

Shelter Half: Each soldier should have one half, not a full shelter tent. Three vertical panels of 8 oz./yard cotton drill material approximately 66" long and 65" wide, with bone buttons, hand stitched button holes, and hand-stitched 1/4" grommet pairs on two corners for peg loop ropes. Issued tent poles were rare and are generally not appropriate.

 

The Arsenal - "Early War" 3-piece Shelter Half; turned hardwood tent stakes

Haversack Depot - Federal Shelter Tent Half, three piece

Heywood Shelters - 1862 Model, 8 oz. drill

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Osgood Historical Clothiers - Type IIa shelter half

W., W. & Co. - Early War Federal Issue Shelter Half

 

Rubber Blanket: Vulcanized "India rubber" coated cotton drill or muslin approximately 79" x 45" (a wide variety of sizes were issued), with 1/4" brass grommets. As your rubber blanket may at times be your only shelter, men of larger than average size may consider a longer and/or wider blanket.

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - Gum Blanket #319 (inquire for custom sizes)

 

Blanket: 100% wool or wool/shoddy mix, brown/gray with gray/black end stripes, 80-85" long and 57-68" wide, weighing close to five pounds, with or without "US" stitched in center.

 

County Cloth - U.S. Regulation Blanket, 1851-1872

Family Heirloom Weavers - Federal Blanket

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - "Keagy-Noble" Federal Issue Blanket (Waterside Woolen Mills) #A-065

Quartermaster Woolens - Abraham Thomas' blanket

Waterside Woolen Mills - Keagy-Noble Blanket

 

Knapsack:   Model 1855 (Federal double-bag) knapsack. Buckles should be japanned (black lacquered) steel, hooks should be brass. A blanket roll (your rolled up wool and/or rubber blanket containing a few belongings and worn over your shoulder) is also very accurate.

 

Historic Clothiers - Early War Contract Double Bag

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Double Bag Knapsack #DBKS

 

 

Rounding Out Your Impression

 

            When you have all the items required for full marching order, you may find the following items useful in developing a more well-rounded impression. All of these items are optional and should only be purchased after you are fully equipped in quality "issue" gear.

 

Overcoat: U. S. Foot Pattern greatcoat of sky-blue, 18-20 ounce/yard 100% wool kersey with a visible twill weave, cotton or osnaburg sleeve lining and wool flannel lining in body, with five infantry "eagle" buttons on the front and six on the cape. Greatcoats were usually put in storage or "lost" from April until September, so are generally not appropriate during those months.

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions - Federal Issue Overcoat, Foot Pattern

Historic Clothiers

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Osgood Historical Clothiers - Foot Pattern Federal Greatcoat

 

Civilian Hat: Civilian hats of black fur or wool felt with cotton or polished cotton lining, hand sewn leather sweatband, satin band around the crown with a real or false bow on the left side, and the brim bound with grosgrain ribbon. Brim should be flat with the edges slightly turned up. Brass insignia, hat cords, feathers and other decorations should not be used unless dictated by a particular event scenario.

 

Clearwater Hat Co. - Slouch; Shiloh; Antietam; Gettysburg; Pork Pie; Plug

Dirty Billy’s Hats - Round Crown #C12; 1860s Pork Pie #C22; Appomatox #C23; Mosby #C4;

T. P. & H. Trading Co. - Flat Top; Medium Crown Bowler; Flat-top Bowler, Mosby style; Porkpie; Telescope Crown

 

Vest: Can be made of wool, cotton, linen, or a blend of natural fabrics. Vests should be of period construction, with seven to nine front buttons and hand sewn button holes. Vests may be made on any period pattern with a shawl collar, standing collar, falling (or notched) collar, or no collar. As a general rule, your vest collar should be of the same style as your coat collar. Vests should fall a few inches below the front trowser waist band, and should be cut almost straight across the bottom, not pointed like a modern vest. Double-breasted vests should be worn only with double-breasted coats, while a singe-breasted vest can be worn with any coat. Vests should be lined with cotton, polished cotton, or muslin, and the back should be of cotton or polished cotton with a belt adjustment at the back waist.  Two or three pockets are accurate, three was most common. There was no "army issue" vest, all vests are civilian clothing. The standing collar style is often referred to as "military style" but it is no more accurate for a soldier than other collar styles.

 

Nancy Eddins - various styles and fabrics

Historic Clothiers - "Military" Style; "Civilian" Shawl collar

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Civilian Shirt: Can be machine stitched, but must have hand worked button holes and hand top stitching, with "felled" seams. Fall collars are preferred. One or two chest pockets were very common. Buttons should be small, porcelain, china, shell, bone, or glass, sewn on with an "x." Shirts should have three or four front buttons and the button placket should be long, about halfway down the shirt front. Shirts should be 100% cotton, and can be checked, plaid, or striped. Printed fabrics and calicoes were used for women's dresses. Do not buy a "bib front" or "fireman's" shirt, or a white/off-white muslin or cotton "reenactor" shirt.

 

Historic Clothiers - Civilian Shirt (a ready-made, very fashionable, commercially available shirt)

Home Front - Civilian Shirt ; Holliday Shirt (older style, home made shirts)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Myrtle Avenue Clothiers - Civilian Homespun Shirt (an older style, home made shirt)

W., W. & Co. - Civilian Shirt (a ready-made, "dry goods store" shirt)

 

Jewelry and Watches: Modern and period wedding bands, or a locket from a sweetheart worn under clothing, are acceptable. Mid-19th century Masonic jewelry or other period fraternal organization jewelry are appropriate only if you are a member of that organization. Do not wear modern jewelry or other ornamentation, including earrings.

            Pocket watches of the period were "key-wind, key-set", with Roman numerals (note that a 19th century Roman numeral "four" was "IIII" rather than the modern "IV"). Both open faced watches and "hunting cases" with hinged covers were common. Watch chains should have a spring hook on the watch end, and a "T-bar" on the other end to attach through a button hole. Decorative fobs are appropriate, or simply hang a watch key from the loose end. No source of reproduction key-wind watches is currently available, carry an original at your own discretion.

 

Michael D. Clark - restored antique watches, possibly antique watch chains

The Jeweler's Daughter - reproduction wedding bands and Masonic rings

River Junction Trade Co. - open face wind up watch, Style #1; watch chain #2 or #3 with wreath, circular burst, Victorian dangle, or Masonic fobs (avoid obvious cowboy/shooter items); replacement "T-bars"

Jas. Townsend & Son - pocket watch #PW-750 (belt hook on end of chain will need to be replaced with a "T-bar")


Commissioned Officers

 

Coat: Most commonly, officers wore privately purchased frock or sack coats. Frocks should be single breasted, and have a single row of nine equally spaced buttons down the front. Fabric should be dark blue 100% wool broadcloth, with lining of polished cotton in the body and muslin in the sleeves. Sack coats should be longer than an enlisted man’s fatigue blouse, but similar in appearance. Officer's sack coats often had five buttons, and most had two or more outside pockets. Fabric should be 100% wool broadcloth or wool flannel (see enlisted fatigue blouse) with appropriate lining. Both frock and sack coats must be of period design and construction, with hand worked buttonholes and brass “spread eagle” buttons. Coats should be adorned with shoulder straps appropriate for rank.

 

Historic Clothiers - Junior Officer's Dress Coat

C. & D. Jarnagin - Federal Officer Sack Coat # 820; Federal Officer Frock Coat #SB822

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Military Furnishings - Extra Rich Officer Shoulder Straps; Miniature Shoulder Straps (late war); Single Border Shoulder Straps

 

Vest: Officers may wear a vest of any period style. White and light cream colored vests were popular, especially among fashionable younger officers, but vests can be made of wool, cotton, linen, or a blend of natural fabrics. Vests should be of period construction, with seven to nine front buttons and hand sewn button holes. Vests may be made on any period pattern with a shawl collar, standing collar, falling (or notched) collar, or no collar. Vest fronts should be lined with cotton, polished cotton, or muslin, and the back should be of cotton or polished cotton with a belt adjustment at the back waist. Vests should fall a few inches below the front trowser waist band, and should be cut almost straight across the bottom, not pointed like a modern vest. Two, three or four pockets are accurate. There was no "army issue" vest, all vests are civilian clothing. The standing collar style is often referred to as "military style" but it is no more accurate for a soldier than other collar styles.

 

Nancy Eddins - various styles and fabrics

Historic Clothiers - "Military" Style; "Civilian" Style

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Shirt: Officers may choose to wear a white linen or cotton dress shirt of period construction, or may wear an issue shirt (see enlisted shirt) or a civilian shirt. Shirts c an be machine stitched, but must have hand worked button holes and hand top stitching, with "felled" seams. Fall collars are preferred. One or two chest pockets were very common. Buttons should be small, porcelain, china, shell, bone, or glass, sewn on with an "x." Shirts should have three or four front buttons and the button placket should be long, about halfway down the shirt front. Shirts should be 100% cotton, and can be checked, plaid, or striped. Make sure checks, plaids, or stripes are woven into the fabric rather than printed. Do not buy a "bib front" or "fireman's" shirt, or a white/off-white muslin or cotton "reenactor" shirt.

 

Historic Clothiers - Pleated Linen Shirt (fine quality dress shirt); Civilian Shirt (a ready-made, very fashionable, commercially available shirt)

Home Front - Civilian Shirt; Holliday Shirt (an older style, home made shirt)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Myrtle Avenue Clothiers - Civilian Homespun Shirt (an older style, home made shirt)

W., W. & Co. - Civilian Shirt (a ready-made, "dry goods store" shirt)

 

Cravat (optional): Any style civilian cravat is appropriate.

 

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Trowsers: Officers trowsers should be of the same design and construction as enlisted men’s trowsers but may have a belt adjustment at the back vent. Officers may choose to wear sky-blue enlisted men’s trowsers rather than dark blue officer’s trowsers (see enlisted trowsers).

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - Officer Foot Trousers #OF806 (specifiy band/welt on watch pocket)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Suspenders: (see enlisted section)

 

Drawers: (see enlisted section)

 

Socks: (see enlisted section)

 

Shoes/Boots: Officers may wear infantry boots of period design and construction, or civilian footwear, but are encouraged to wear the same Jefferson bootees issued to enlisted men (see enlisted bootees ).

 

Mattimore Harness - Civilian Boot; Spencer Tie Shoe; Artillery Driver Boot

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co. - Civil War Boots #BO-1; #BO-1.5

 

Hat: Officers may wear the hat of their choice: civilian hat, U.S. Army officer's dress hat, kepi, or forage cap. Hats may be worn with or without hat cords and insignia. Accurate insignia is a gold embroidered infantry bugle on a black background, with regimental number embroidered in silver in the “bend” of the bugle.  Use of regimental numbers is discouraged as we often portray regiments other than the “2nd.”

 

Clearwater Hat Co. - Slouch; Shiloh; Antietam; Gettysburg; Pork Pie; Plug

Dirty Billy’s Hats - Round Crown #C12; 1860s Pork Pie #C22; Appomatox #C23; Mosby #C4

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Military Furnishings - hat and cap insignia

Chris Semancik - Kepi style cap; Captain Pierce's cap (both are private purchase caps)

Greg Starbuck - various private purchase kepis and forage caps

T. P. & H. Trading Co. - Flat Top; Medium Crown Bowler; Flat-top Bowler - Mosby style; Porkpie; Telescope Crown; Hardee 1858 Dress Hat, officer

 

Sword Belt & Plate: Plain black leather belt between 1 1/2  and 2 inches wide, with black leather slings and a brass hook, and a rectangular gold colored “eagle” belt plate with silver wreath. Belt may include an optional one-inch wide leather baldric.

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - US Officer Sword Belt # OF231; US Officer Sword Belt Plate #B205 (specify silver wreath)

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Sword & Scabbard: 1850 U.S. Army foot officer’s sword with brass guard and leather grip. Sword blade may be engraved or plain. Look for a piece of red leather at the hilt end of the blade, the same size as the head of the scabbard. Scabbard should be of leather with brass throat, drag, and attachment rings. Another common sword was a German import with steel scabbard and fittings, now commonly known as the “Peterson 75.” Swords with a “nut” on the end of the pommel are not acceptable.

 

Legendary Arms - US M1850 Foot Officers Sword (specify leather covered scabbard)

 

Pistol (optional): The most common side arm for officers was the .44 caliber Colt Army revolver. Also extremely popular were the .36 caliber Colt Navy and Remington .44 caliber Army and .36 caliber Navy. Some smaller caliber “pocket pistols” were privately purchased. U.S. revolvers were made with steel frames. Avoid brass framed Confederate copies of the popular U.S. models.

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - M1860 Colt Army # EA6040; M1851 Colt Navy #EA6010; M1858 Remington New Model Army #EA6010

Orchard Hill Sutlery - 1851 Colt Navy (steel) #W-012; 1858 Remington New Model Army (steel) #W-009; 1860 Colt Army (steel) #W-014; 1861 Colt Navy # W-015

 

Pistol Holster: Plain black leather with one belt loop sewn or riveted on the back, with a brass closure. Most common holster was the “right side, butt forward” style but other styles are acceptable. A holster is required if a pistol is carried.

 

Historic Clothiers - Officer's Holster

C. & D. Jarnagin - US Regulation Pistol Holster #280

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

Orchard Hill Sutlery - Holster - Leather "Extra High Quality" #E-043

 

Ammunition Box (optional): Plain black leather with two belt loops sewn or riveted on the back. Pistol ammunition was issued in small tins that could be kept in a pocket; a box is not required.

 

C. & D. Jarnagin - US Pistol Box #209

 

Haversack:   Officers may use an enlisted man’s haversack (see enlisted haversack) or an officer’s haversack. Officer’s haversack may be made of black leather, patent leather, or black painted canvas, with an adjustable leather strap. The flap may be “pressed” or tooled with various designs or left plain.

 

Historic Clothiers - Officer's Haversack

Jersey Skillet Licker Products (retail source for several vendors)

 

Canteen: (see enlisted section)

 

Messware: (see enlisted section)

 

Food: (see enlisted section)

 

Tent: An officer may, at his discretion, carry one or two shelter halves (see enlisted shelter half ) or a small canvas fly approximately equal in size to a full shelter tent.

 

Rubber Blanket: (see enlisted section)

 

Blanket: (see enlisted section)

 

Knapsack: (see enlisted section)

 

Tobacco: Officers, having more money than enlisted men, were able to purchase cigars. An officer would certainly be known to smoke a pipe or chew tobacco as well (see enlisted tobacco).

 

The Haversack - cigars, pipes, assorted pipe and chewing tobacco

 

Spectacles: (see enlisted section)

 

Personal Hygiene and Medications: (see enlisted section)

 

Hair Styles: (see enlisted section)

 

Jewelry and Watches: (see enlisted section)

 


Approved Vendors - Contact Information

 


Abraham & Co.

Sarah Waller

22919 Brightland Dr

Lawrenceberg IN 47025

(888) 575-6569

abrahamsmerc@aol.com

www.abraham-and-company.com

 

The Arsenal

PO Box 621

Newport NH 03773

(603) 863-6262 (Mon. - Sat., 9am - 12pm eastern)

USArsenal@aol.com

members.aol.com/usarsenal/home.html

 

G. H. Bent Company

7 Pleasant St

Milton MA 02186

(617) 698-5945

info@bentscookiefactory.com

www.hardtackcracker.com/hardtack.htm

 

Mickey Black

6378 US 601

Salisbury NC 28147

(704) 637-3331

blackm@cone.com

www.salisburyemporium.com/mickeyblacksocks.htm

 

Camp Randall Quartermaster

John Wedeward

www2.inxpress.net/jwedeward/

Available only through Jersey Skillet Licker Products

 

Michael D. Clark

PO Box 641

Williamsburg OH 45176

(513) 724-3167

 

Clearwater Hat Company

Bob & Kay Burton

1002 Clearwater Rd

Newnata AK 72680

(870) 746-4324

burton@mvtel.net

www.clearwaterhats.com

 

County Cloth, Inc.

Charlie Childs

13797-C Georgetown St NE

Paris OH 44669

(330) 862-3307

CRChilds@bright.net

www.bright.net/~crchilds/index.htm

 

C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions

Chris Daley

PO Box 133

Chewsville MD 21721

(301) 766-7112

tailor@cjdaley.com

www.CJDaley.com

 

Dirt Billy's Hats

Bill & Fran Wickham

7574 Middleburg Rd

Detour MD 21757

(410) 775-1865

DirtyBills@aol.com

www.dirtybillyshats.com

 

Dixie Gun Works

PO Box 130

Union City TN 38281

(731) 885-0700

www.dixiegunworks.com

 

Family Heirloom Weavers

Pat Kline

125 O'San Ln

Red Lion PA 17356

(717) 246-5797

pdk62@mailstation.com

www.familyheirloomweavers.com

 

Nancy Eddins

Available only through Stevenson House

 

G. & P. Mercantile

George Pimental

2476 Canterbury Chase

Murfreesboro TN 37128

(615) 895-1515

gpimental@comcast.net

www.gpmerc.com

 

G. Gedney Godwin

PO Box 100

Valley Forge PA 19481

(610) 783-0670

www.gggodwin.com/page17.htm

 

Chris Graham

1420 E Vineyard Rd

Hayesville NC 28904

(704) 389-6126

 

The Haversack

112 2nd Av N

Nashville TN 37201

(615) 254-3338

TheHaversack@aol.com

www.thehaversack.com

 

Haversack Depot

Phil Cavanaugh

PO Box 311262

New Braunfels TX 78131

(830) 620-5192

philc@wireweb.net

www.haversackdepot.com

 

Heywood Shelters

Dan Cheatum

616 Bakersfield Rd

Carbondale IL 62901

(618) 529-3038

DanCheatum@aol.com

members.tripod.com/pcalloway/heywood.htm

 

Historic Clothiers

Nick Sekela

 

 

Home Front

Janet Balthrop

1821 Nixon Dr

Boerne TX 78006

(830) 336-3847

sjlrbal@gvtc.com

gvtc.com/~sjlrbal

 

C. & D. Jarnagin Company

PO Box 1860

Corinth MS 38835-1860

(662) 287-4977

cjarnag@jarnaginco.com

www.jarnaginco.com

 

 

 

The Jeweler's Daughter

Susan Saum-Wicklein

2 W Washington St

Hagerstown MD 21740

(301) 733-6741

jewelers@safe.quik.com

www.jewlersdaughter.net

 

Legendary Arms, Inc.

PO Box 197

Californ NJ 07830

(800) 528-2767

sales@legendaryarms.com

www.legendaryarms.com

 

Lodgewood Mfg.

Bill Osborn

PO Box 611

Whitewater WI 53190-0611

(262) 473-5444

lodgwd@idcnet.com

www.lodgewood.com

 

M. J. N. Boot & Leather Shop

Mick Nesseim

27210 468th Av

Tea SD 57064

(605) 368-2922

mjnboot@sd.value.net

www.mjnboot.com

 

Mattimore Harness

Tom Mattimore

509 South 2nd St

Laramie WY 82070

(307) 745-8460 (evenings only)

tom@civilwarboots.com

www.CivilWarBoots.com

 

Brian "Speedy" Merrick

214 Chambersburg St #1

Gettysburg PA 17325

(717) 337-2722

speedybri@superpa.net

 

Military Furnishings

Wendy Osman

5424 Elliot Av S

Minneapolis MN 55417

(612) 823-4009

calirvine@aol.com

 

Missouri Boot & Shoe Co.

Bob Serio

951 Burr Crossing Rd

Neosho MO 64850

(417) 451-6100

MissouriBootandShoe.tripod.com

 

Myrtle Avenue Clothiers Historical Reproductions

Marc Hermann & Alaina Zulli

245 Henry St

Brooklyn NY 11201

(917) 407-9180

NYCPress@aol.com

www.myrtle-avenue.com

 

Orchard Hill Sutlery

Dan Houde

Dept WP

415 Esperance Rd

Esperance NY 12066

(518) 875-9981

info@orchardhillsutlery.com

www.orchardhillsutlery.com

 

Osgood Historical Clothiers

Casey Osgood

3394 Maple Av

Elmira NY 14901

(607) 734-0080

hardtack@infoblvd.net

osgoodreproductions.tripod.com/homepage.htm

 

Otter Creek Tinware

John Peterson

26 Carver St

Brandon VT 05733

ottertin@saver.net

www.saver.net/~ottertin/ottertin/octinw1.html

 

Quartermaster Woolens

20473 Idaho Av

Lakeville MN 55044

(952) 469-6904

qmwoolens@aol.com

members.aol.com/QMWoolens

 

Re-enactment Eyewear

Don Griffin

1738 E Third St #346

Williamsport PA 17701

(570) 322-9849

reeyewear@aol.com

www.reenactmenteyewear.com

 

River Junction Trade Co.

312 Main St

McGregor IA 52157

(563) 873-2387

folks@riverjunction.com

www.riverjunction.com

 

Chris Semancik

5619 Carroll St

Baltimore MD 21207

TrulyRural@aol.com

www.geocities.com/trulyrural1/cap.html

 

Greg Starbuck

cwkepi@earthlink.net

home.earthlink.net/~cwkepi/index.html

 

 

Spectacle Accoutrements

Gregg Crockett

2918 N Rolling Rd

Baltimore MD 21244

(410) 281-6069

cwspecs@aol.com

ivydiv_mp.tripod.com/spectacleaccoutrements

 

Stevenson House - Antiques and Reproductions

Suzanne Carter Isaacson

156 High St

PO Box 1171

Harper's Ferry WV 25425

(304) 535-2625

TheStevensonHouse@yahoo.com

www.TheStevensonHouse.com

 

T. P. & H. Trading Company

Tim Bender

121 Carriage Dr

Birdsboro PA 19508

(610) 582-0327

tph_trading@msn.com

www.timbenderhats.com

 

Tart, Brantley & Benjamin

Ben Tart

1451 Old Goldsboro Rd

Newton Grove NC 28366

(910) 594-1332

Mordantman@aol.com

www.BenTart.com

 

Jas. Townsend and Son

Jonathan Townsend

PO Box 415-W

Pierceton IN 46562

(574) 594-5852

jastown@jastown.com

www.jastown.com

 

R. Ubben Pipes

Randy Ubben

53 Dean Rd

New Milford CT 06776

woodreb@earthlink.net

www.rubbenpipes.com

 

Village Tinsmithing Works

Bill & Judy Hoover

PO Box 539

Hamptonville NC 27020

(336) 468-1190

www.csa-dixie.com/villagetinsmith

 

Waterside Woolen Mills

Todd Detwiler

2526 Waterside Dr

Woodbury PA 16695

(814) 766-3820

info@watersidewoolens.com

www.watersidewoolens.com

 

W., W. & Company

Dan Wambaugh

(517) 644-2991 (3pm - 9pm)

dwambaugh@wwandcompany.net

www.wwandcompany.net

 

Ed Welch's Antique Vintage Eyeglasses

Ed Welch

Augusta Rd

Winslow ME

(207) 872-5849

edwelch@metiques.com

www.metiques.com/catalog/glasses.html

John Zimmerman, Gunsmith

PO Box 1351

Harpers Ferry WV 25425

(304) 535-2558

www.edsmart.com/jz